An Easy Guide To Finding The Right Career Path

Right Career Path

Your career is one of the most influential aspects of your life, and it can be difficult to decide what you want. There are many options and paths you can take, and it’s important to find the right one for you. This guide will help make the process easier and show you how to find the right career path for you.

Know Your Interests

Your interests are a good place to start when finding the right career. Your interests can be defined as whatever you regularly enjoy doing. If you like to drive, becoming a delivery driver is a viable career choice, especially if you Google “how much do instacart shoppers make” or how much other similar delivery jobs pay and see the results. Knowing your interests will help you focus your job search and find careers that fit you. 

To find your interests, brainstorm as many interests as possible. If you can’t think of any, ask your friends or family what they think your interests are. Once you have a list, narrow it down to the top five that are most interesting to you. After narrowing your list down, rate each interest on a scale of 1 – 10 based on how much it appeals to you or excites you. This will help leave out careers that sound interesting but aren’t appealing enough for you to pursue them full time for about 40 hours every week somewhere between the ages of 18 and 65 (the average length of employment).

Consider Your Skills

Next, you should think about your skills. These are the talents and abilities that you have acquired through either education or experience. Make a list of the skills you already possess that you enjoy using. This list should be added to the interests list. These skills will help you narrow your career choices by finding careers that make use of the skills you enjoy using. Here are the most useful skills and the careers for them:

  • Cooking is a valuable skill that can be used for many careers. A few examples are becoming a personal chef, starting a catering business, or becoming a food critic.
  • Carpentry is another valuable skill that can be used for many different careers. A few examples are becoming a carpenter, contractor, or cabinetmaker.
  • Web development is a skill that is in high demand. A few examples of careers in web development are becoming a web developer, web designer, or SEO specialist.
  • Computer programming is another skill that is in high demand and can be used for many different careers. A few examples are becoming a computer programmer, software engineer, or systems administrator.
  • Sewing is a skill that can be used for certain careers. A few examples are becoming an alterations specialist, fashion designer, or clothing maker.
  • Writing is the most versatile skill you have. There are countless ways to use writing in your career. Some possibilities are starting your own blog or becoming a book author, screenplay writer, scriptwriter, reporter, ghostwriter, or journalist.

Think about Your Personality

Your personality can also help you find the right career path. Consider the personality traits that best describe you. Are you creative? Are you a leader? Do you like working with people? These are some of the questions to ask yourself when thinking about your personality. Here are some common personality types and the careers best suited for them:

1. ISTJ: An introverted and serious person who likes to be prepared and organized. They like to do things right the first time and don’t like taking risks.

ISTJs use their experience and planning skills in many careers, such as becoming a project manager, executive assistant, or market research analyst.

2. ESTP: A social and fun-loving person who likes to take risks and is active. They are good at improvising and like to be the life of the party.

ESTPs use their energy and people skills in many careers, such as becoming a real estate agent, event planner, or car salesperson.

3. ISFP: A creative and caring person who likes to be alone and focus on the present moment. They like having a quiet and simple lifestyle and dislike conflict.

ISFPs use their creativity and people skills in many careers, such as becoming an interior decorator, tattoo artist or fashion designer.

4. ESFJ: A social person who enjoys helping others and working in an organized and structured environment. They like having security and working hard to achieve their goals.

ESFJs use their people skills, organization skills, and sense of security in many careers, such as becoming a teacher or nurse.

5. ISFJ: A loyal person who enjoys helping others and likes to preserve traditions. They like having security and working hard to achieve their goals.

ISFJs use their people skills, organization skills, and sense of security in many careers, such as becoming a teacher or nurse.

6. ESFP: A social person who enjoys helping others and is spontaneous and fun-loving. They like having security and working hard to achieve their goals.

ESFPs use their people skills, organization skills, and sense of security in many careers, such as becoming a teacher or nurse.

7. ESTJ: A loyal and hard-working person who enjoys having security and working hard to achieve their goals. They like being able to plan ahead and dislike distractions.

ESTJs use their organizational skills and hard work ethic in many careers, such as becoming a bank manager, accountant, or doctor.

Think About Your Values

Your values are another important factor to consider when looking for a career. Your values can be defined as your personal standards of right and wrong. Think about the values that are important to you and try to find a career that supports those values: Some examples of common values and the careers that best support them include:

1. Achievement: A person who likes this value enjoys working hard to achieve their goals, so they often choose careers where they can be successful, such as becoming an entrepreneur or business owner.

2. Creativity: A person who values creativity likes to be creative and make their own decisions, so they often choose careers where they can express themselves creatively, such as becoming a teacher or artist.

3. Financial Security: A person who values financial security is focused on providing for themselves and their loved ones, so they often choose careers that offer a stable income, such as becoming a doctor or engineer.

4. Helping Others: A person who values helping others is often drawn to careers in the medical field or with social services, such as becoming a doctor or social worker.

5. Integrity: A person who values integrity prefers to do work that is honest and sincere, so they often choose careers where their character will be respected, such as becoming an accountant or police officer.

6. Popularity: A person who values popularity likes working in fast-paced environments with lots of action and attention, so they often choose careers that give them the most social interaction possible, such as becoming a personal trainer or actor.

Finding the right career path for you can seem like a daunting task, but it doesn’t have to be. By thinking about your interests, values, and skills, you can narrow down your options and find the perfect career for you. So get out there and explore all of your options!